Join a Student Group

If you're not happy with the direction of the country and you want to take back your future, at some point you will have to do something. It's not enough to just know that we're going in the wrong direction. You actually have to step out and get involved.

Most college campuses have conservative and libertarian student groups. Find one of them to join.

Below is a list of some of the larger non-profit groups out there fighting for freedom on campuses across the country. These groups help students in a variety of ways, such as through training, by bringing in speakers, offering activism tools, scholarships, and more.

Click for more details:
Bureaucrash
CampusReform.org

Collegiate Network
Institute for Humane Studies
Intercollegiate Studies Institute
Leadership Institute
Network of enlightened Women (NeW)
Students for Liberty (SFL)

Bureaucrash - "Bureaucrash is an international network of activists, called crashers, who share the goal of increasing individual freedom and decreasing the scope of government. Through Bureaucrash Social, crashers connect and collaborate on ways to use guerrilla marketing and new media to introduce others to the ideas of individual liberty, personal responsibility, and free markets. In short, we fight for freedom."

CampusReform.org - "CampusReform.org is designed to provide conservative activists with the resources, networking capabilities, and skills they need to revolutionize the struggle against leftist bias and abuse on college campuses.

Created to give conservatives powerful new weapons in their fight for the hearts and minds of the next generation of citizens, politicians, and members of the media, CampusReform.org facilitates the establishment of conservative student networks and supports their development as a powerful voice of activism on their campuses. It makes available new opportunities for groups’ interaction with alumni, parents, faculty, and other members of the broader community interested in taking a stand for conservative principles on America’s college campuses.

Connecting up-to-date communications technologies to a principled stand for limited government, the free market, national defense, and traditional values, CampusReform.org makes possible a new generation of student activism to identify, expose, and combat the radical left now."

Collegiate Network - "For more than 25 years, the Collegiate Network has supported independent college newspapers that serve to focus public awareness on the politicization of American college and university classrooms, curricula, student life, and the resulting decline of educational standards. Each year over 100 papers across the country enjoy the benefits of a membership with the Collegiate Network, and the number continues to grow. CN member papers have earned reputations for both in-depth reporting and witty commentary. They serve to raise the level of discourse on the campus and provide an outlet for students to keep university faculty and administrations honest. Many prominent journalists have got their start by working for a CN paper."

Institute for Humane Studies (IHS) - "Today, with a primary focus on students, the Institute continues the work begun by Baldy Harper. The mission of IHS is to support the achievement of a freer society by discovering and facilitating the development of talented, productive students, scholars, and other intellectuals who share an interest in liberty and who demonstrate the potential to help change the current climate of opinion to one more congenial to the principles and practice of freedom.

Each year IHS awards over $600,000 in scholarships to students from universities around the world. IHS also sponsors the attendance of hundreds of students at its summer seminars and provides various forms of career assistance. Through these and other programs, the Institute promotes the study of liberty across a broad range of disciplines, encouraging understanding, open inquiry, rigorous scholarship, and creative problem-solving."

Intercollegiate Studies Institute - "The Intercollegiate Studies Institute (ISI) is a non-profit, non-partisan, tax-exempt educational organization whose purpose is to further in successive generations of college youth a better understanding of the values and institutions that sustain a free and humane society.

Founded in 1953, ISI works 'to educate for liberty' — to identify the best and the brightest college students and to nurture in these future leaders the American ideal of ordered liberty. To accomplish this goal, ISI seeks to enhance the rising generation's knowledge of our nation's founding principles — limited government, individual liberty, personal responsibility, the rule of law, market economy, and moral norms.

Leadership Institute - "The Leadership Institute’s mission is to increase the number and effectiveness of conservative activists and leaders in the public policy process. To accomplish this mission, the Institute identifies, recruits, trains, and places conservatives in government, politics, and the media.

Founded in 1979 by its president, Morton C. Blackwell, the Leadership Institute (LI) teaches conservatives the nuts and bolts of how to succeed in the public policy process.

The Institute strives to produce a new generation of public policy leaders unwavering in their commitment to free enterprise, limited government, strong national defense, and traditional values. Institute graduates are equipped with practical skills and professional training to implement sound principles through effective public policy."

Network of enlightened Women (NeW) - "NeW is the nation's premier club for conservative university women. Started as a book club at the University of Virginia in 2004, NeW aims to cultivate a community of conservative women and expand intellectual diversity on university campuses through its focus on education. NeW members meet regularly to discuss issues relating to politics, gender and conservative principles. NeW has expanded to over  twenty colleges nationwide.

NeW has chapters on the following campuses: Arizona College of Law, Arizona State University, College of William and Mary, Emory College of Law, Florida State University, Indiana University, Meredith College, North Carolina State University, Ohio State University, Purdue University, Smith College, The King’s College, University of Central Florida, University of Dallas, University of Florida, University of Idaho, University of Kentucky, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Tampa (MBA Program), University of Virginia, and the University of Virginia Law."

Students for Liberty (SFL) - "The philosophy of liberty is in jeopardy today. The older generations have let us down, and there seem to be few short-term solutions. Our hope for a free society lies in the future. The best investment one can make to promote liberty today is in the youth, particularly in students.

Students are in a unique position that makes them open to the ideas of liberty. Academia is an environment premised on a belief in debate and inquiry where all ideas are welcome to be presented and inspected by each individual. Students have not fully formulated their beliefs and so are interested in inquiring into different world views. But without support from their academic or peer groups, there is no hope for students to consider the ideas of liberty as viable alternatives to authoritarianism.

There are two types of students who enter college: those who are unfamiliar with the ideas of liberty and those who already believe in liberty. Many students have never read Locke’s Second Treatise, Bastiat’s The Law, or even the Declaration of Independence beyond the quote 'Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness'. What these students need is exposure to the principles of liberty that underscore a prosperous society. The second group of students enter academia with the hope of developing a greater understanding of their beliefs, yet that they so often are beaten down to the point where they give up on their belief in liberty and never develop their potential to further the cause or support the philosophy.

The problem is significant, but the solution is clear: There is a need for an organization to counter the climate of authoritarianism on campus by directly supporting students dedicated to liberty.  

SFL provides a year-round forum of support with consulting services, networking, and various resources to students and student organizations."

More About This Topic...

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Quote Page

Quotes on presidential czars from columnists, economists, and political experts.

Commentary or Blog Post

"When a president wants to signal that an issue really matters, there is nothing like a czar. President-elect Barack Obama is making clear that many issues matter to him.

The idea is to have someone in the White House with the president's ear to coordinate policy and give the topic the weight it deserves. Such a post gives an issue prominence, allows for coordination among agencies and...

James points out that Obama's top bureaucrats--called "czars" by the media--are nothing new, citing the extensive executive branches of FDR, Nixon, and George W. Bush.

Not only has the notion of President Obama's policy "czars" prompted controversy, but several of the czars themselves have been implicated in scandal.

Following the controversial budget deal in early 2011, this piece notes how President Obama failed to keep his end of the bargain.

Albert cautions that empowering the executive branch without the permission of the Senate looks more like the British parliamentary system than the republic the American founders imagined.

Given the many czar positions that have now been created, however, this piece goes on to ponder whether the aforementioned goal is actually being obstructed rather than achieved.

Coffman worries that Obama's policy executives have implemented thousands of pages of regulation, much of which is without the oversight or approval of Congress.

"A liberal senator on Wednesday questioned President Barack Obama's policy 'czars' after the senior advisers have taken heat mostly from Republican lawmakers.

Sen. Russ Feingold (D-Wis.) sent a letter to the president requesting the White House release information regarding the 'roles and responsibilities' of the 'czars.' The Senate Judiciary Committee member also requested that the...

Sarlin outlines the stories and credentials of the Obama Administration's most notable policy "czars", including officials who oversaw the financial bailout and U.S. economic regulatory platforms.

As a part of the continuing resolutions to keep the federal government running, Republicans successfully added an amendment defunding President Obama's senior advisors on top policy issues like heath care and energy.

Rothkopf compares the long secession of Russian Czars from 1613 until 1917 to the Obama Administration's many policy "czars".

The White House's record number of policy chiefs, or "czars", has launched controversy in the media and in Congress.

Unlike his presidential predecessors, Obama's first months in office are reported to focus more on appointing policy "czars" than assembling a cabinet.

Cantor writes that the infiltration of policy "czars" in the Obama Administration has placed far too much emphasis on the executive branch.

Erbe believes this type of executive position epitomizes a lack of respect for budget or accountability.

On paper, they are special advisers, chairmen of White House boards, special envoys and Cabinet agency deputies, asked by the president to guide high-priority initiatives.

"Five constitutional experts testified at a Senate hearing Tuesday that President Obama's extensive use of policy 'czars' is legal -- as long as the officials do not overstep their authority.

In a city where power is carefully hoarded and monitored, Obama has drawn complaints from Congress about his use of the so-called czars, officials he has appointed to coordinate environmental,...

The White House positions aren't subject to congressional oversight, which raises concerns about balance of power.

The political usefulness of a czar is that it allows the President to underscore the importance of an issue/

Government officials engage in a debate over whether or not the White House's policy "czars" truly disrupt the American system of Checks and Balances.

Jonah Goldberg uses this brief blog post to describe the origins and historical connotations of the word "czar."

This post describes how several Republican representatives sought to reign in President Obama's use of the czar position.

Healy fears that the Right's focus on eliminating the White House's "czars" distracts from the larger issue: a corrosive trend of unapproved and largely unaccountable presidential advisors.

Byrd is said to draw from his long career in the Senate as a warning against the dangers of unapproved officials.

"A pattern of governance has emerged in Washington that departs substantially from that envisaged in our Constitution. Under our basic concept of governance: (1) a president and vice president are elected; and (2) the departments of government are staffed by constitutional officers including secretaries, undersecretaries, assistant secretaries and others who are nominated by the president and...

Kevin Sholette seeks to determine whether or not Feinberg's authority is constitutionally sound.

Dunn implied that those who questioned the administration's use of czars were hypocritical, and were only taking an accusatory stance because of the party in the White House.

Du Pont points out that the Obama Administration's prolific number of policy "czars" runs directly counter to Obama's campaign rhetoric

Chart or Graph

Popular political cartoonist Bob Englehart pokes fun at the ever-evolving layers of executive bureaucracy.

This chart lists 28 of President Obama's czars and their official titles. The confirmed salaries of some of the czars - ranging from $98,000 to $172,000 - are especially interesting.

This easy-to-read chart displays the official titles of Obama's "Czars", revealing which have been confirmed by the Senate--and the many which have not.

A list of the few Obama Administration "Czars" that have actually received Senate Confirmation, as of Spring 2010.

Analysis Report White Paper

We discuss what exactly a czar is, why presidents have turned to them with increasing frequency in recent decades, and the relationship between the ascendancy of czars and the constitutional underpinnings of separation of powers and checks and balances.

Americans have always mistrusted executive power, but only recently has 'the unitary executive' emerged as the bogeyman of American politics.

Increased doctrinal room for a president to realize his political program by using the agency form will decrease his incentives to find politically and legally opaque ways to work such influence from the White House.

After examining White House domination of policy making in the Obama presidency, the chapter will analyze the friction with the cabinet and Congress caused by Obama’s appointment of many White House 'czars.'

Recognizing the recent rise of the presidential czar position and the ambiguity surrounding it, Jacqueline Weyand sets out to trace the history and legal precedent for executive czars in America.

This edition of the PRG Report finds presidency scholars exploring the world of unilateral (or nearly unilateral) presidential powers.

"This paper discusses these questions, in an admittedly preliminary way, with reference to historical practice and the first six months of the Obama administration."

Video/Podcast/Media

This news clip expresses Representative Darrell Issa's concern over the fact that many of the President's czars are not accountable to Congress. Issa also raises questions about the lack of transparency concerning the payroll of the President's czars.

Dan Mitchell, a fellow at the Cato Institute, responds to the concern that unapproved administrative appointees are overseeing massive federal tasks and funds.

The numerous unapproved policy bureaucrats in the Obama Administration can be difficult to track. Pajamas Media has put together a helpful video with descriptions of 36 chief government wonks.

Press Secretary Gibbs avoids directly responding to concerns over Senator Feingold's letter to President Obama. Feingold's letter voiced unease at the growing number of "Czars" in the Obama Administration.

In this video segment Spalding details how the rise of Czars in American government--unelected bureaucrats with great regulatory power--pose a grave threat to the liberty of all Americans and fly in the face of the nature of the Constitution.

Primary Document

This cause came on for consideration of appellant's emergency motion for a stay pending appeal and appellees' opposition thereto, and the court heard argument of counsel.

This paper features an extensive list of President Obama's czars. The document creates an individual profile for each czar detailing their job description, past experience, and in some instances, their individual salary.

Although generally regarded as a case concerned with election campaign funds, this case established some important guidelines in regards to the "Appointments Clause" of the Constitution.

In this piece, Senator Hutchinson opines that the increased use of czars in the Obama administration is a dangerous usurpation of "separation of powers."

This case, along with others which dealt with the "Appointments Clause," is helpful in determining the legality and authority of presidential czars.

Speaking to the Senate, Spalding provides a brief modern history of Congress' delegation of power to a group of technical, insulated bureaucrats.

In this document Harry Truman establishes "the Office of Defense Mobilization."

Shortly after the attack on Pearl Harbor, President Roosevelt established the "Office of Censorship." This document describes the establishment of the office and also appoints "Byron Price" as the "Director of Censorship," (or Czar) over this agency.

The article gives information on the circumstances surrounding Chester Davis' appointment to the "Food Czar" position and explains what his job would entail.

In response to a request by the Subcommittee on the Constitution, John Harrison provided legal advice on the "employment of so-called 'Czars' within the executive branch."

This letter to President Franklin Roosevelt documents the resignation of Chester Davis, FDR's "Food Czar."

The Counsel of the President responds to Senator Feingold's concerns over Administrative "Czars". Mr. Craig claims that such criticisms of executive positions are misinformed, since all positions are accountable and transparent.

This case revolves around the Constitution's "Appointments Clause" and discusses what constitutes a "'principal' or an 'inferior' officer."

Expressing concern over the many czars appointed during the early months of the Obama administration, Senator Russ Feingold sought to examine their constitutionality.

This link features a hearing on the position of czars in the American presidency.

Following the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, President Bush created the Department of Homeland Security. This document provides his remarks at the swearing-in ceremony of the Department's first czar, Tom Ridge.

Given the rising concern over drug abuse, President Reagan created the "Drug Abuse Policy Office" and appointed Carlton Turner as the first "drug czar."

Senator Byrd writes a cautionary letter to President Obama regarding what Byrd views as the policy "czars" threat to government and American checks and balances.

Senator Susan Collins, Ranking Member of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, questions the number of 'czars' within the Executive Office.

Following an intense budget battle in early 2011, President Obama signed H.R. 1473. This statement was released in conjunction with the signing and declares the President's rejection of the budget cuts which defunded several of his czars (Section 2262).

This document describes the committee's recommendations for the President, including information on the type and number of assistants he should have.

In this testimony, Bradley Patterson, a member of the Brookings Institution, makes six points about the history, legality, and official meaning of the term "czar."

Associate law professor Samahon delivers an address to the Senate Judiciary Committee, with concern to the constitutionality of Obama's czar appointments.

The Constitution of the United States established the federal governmental system currently in place with three branches of government. The premise of executive privilege developed from the separation of powers clause.

This piece from TIME describes the internal bickering and "lack of direction" that FDR's administration encountered because of the czar issue.

This case dealt with whether or not the "Commissioner of Pensions" and his under-officers were officers of the United States.

After the Watergate scandal, the Court held that separation of powers and confidentiality are not sufficient arguments for permitting absolute, unqualified presidential privilege.

This vintage newspaper clipping describes the creation of the "Office of Defense Mobilization" and the appointment of Charles Wilson as its czar.

Books

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